Its in the Bag campaign launch at Taronga Zoo.

Paper bag trial for local businesses

Posted Friday 27 March 2015

Mosman business operators have seen first-hand the devastating impact of plastics on wildlife and the environment during the launch of a campaign by Mosman Council to switch businesses to paper bags.

Owners of local food outlets Don Adan and Bottom of the Harbour learnt about how they could minimise their impact on the environment by reducing the use of disposable plastic before visiting Taronga Zoo’s Wildlife Hospital where they saw green turtles recovering after consuming plastic bags.

Both businesses are among 11 who have already signed up to the free paper bag trial following Council’s It’s in the Bag plastic bag reduction campaign launch which is raising awareness of single use plastic bags as a major litter item in the community and promoting a ‘one less plastic bag’ approach.

The campaign, funded by the NSW EPA’s Waste Less, Recycle More initiative, provides businesses with paper bags to trial as an alternative to plastic while members of the community will be supplied with reusable shopping bags to reduce the number of plastic bags accepted at the checkout.

Members of the community are being encouraged to reduce their plastic bag use by refusing plastic at the checkout or taking their own reusable bags because residents need to support the switch to paper bags and recycled packaging.

Council is offering reusable bamboo bags to Mosman residents to actively use whilst shopping to spread the “one less plastic bag” message. Interested residents can get their bag at Council’s Civic Centre or by phoning Loani on 9978 4024.


The zoo visit followed a guest speaker event attended by more than 50 people during which marine biologist Meredith Peach and PhD student Vivian Sim spoke about the impact of plastics on the environment.

In February 2013, Mosman Council resolved to undertake research to gain an understanding of community and business support for reducing plastic bags in Mosman. Survey results found that 76% of businesses and 84% of community respondents either agreed or strongly agreed with supporting an education campaign over a voluntary ban or levy on plastic bags.